Amy’s retreat charity event Battle of the Bands: Kiziah and the Kings are the ‘Kings’ of Sheffield

6 May

Battle of the Band winners: Kiziah and the Kings

Doncaster group Kiziah and the Kings came out as winners at a ‘Battle of the Bands’ charity event.

‘Battle of the Bands’ took place at Walkabout, Carver Street, off West Street, on April 4th. Three local bands were given the chance to perform and the audience chose who they wanted to win. Section 60, an indie/ alternative band, performed their 30 minute set first. Contemporary rock group Scrim were up next and had the whole room up dancing. Taking to the stage last were winners by a unanimous decision, Kiziah and the Kings, a soulful group made up of three guys and a girl. Lead singer Kiziah Watson explained what winning meant to them. “It’s a great feeling to win. But we can’t forget what we are all here for, to make money for Amy’s Retreat.”

Section 60

Scrim

Kiziah and the Kings


Battle of the Bands was created in aide of Amy’s Retreat, a Sheffield based charity set up by Joanne and Stephen Hall after their daughter, Amy, died of cancer aged five. The charity gives families with children who suffer from cancer, the chance to go away and spend time together as a family.

Guests were also asked to dress up as their favourite popstar and people turned up as artists such as Lady Gaga, Amy Winehouse, Rihanna, Katy Perry and Elvis.

Danny Child, 19, who came as one of the Village People explained why the event was important to him: “The money raised here tonight will go to a good cause; everyone gets dressed up has a laugh and raises lots of money!”

Emma Robinson, 21, who came as pops bad girl Amy Winehouse explains her choice. “I don’t really smoke and I drink moderately, so I thought I would be her so I get the chance to be a bad girl, even if it’s only for one night. Plus I get to wear a wig and have big hair!”

The best dressed, again decided by the audience, won an award and vouchers for a meal for 2 with a bottle of wine at La Tasca. The winner of the night was Paul Galloway, 25, who was dressed as Garth from Wayne’s Word. “I just came as myself basically, and won the sexiest costume!”

Guests were also automatically entered into a raffle for buying a ticket and prizes included a PizzaExpress hamper, Sheffield United tickets, Nandos vouchers and Lyceum Theatre tickets.

The event raised £400 for Amy’s Retreat, organiser Frances Child, 21, said: “The foundation is completely selfless, and deserves all the exposure it can get. I’m glad to be part of such a great cause and the night has been a success, all my hard work has been worth it.”

For more information on Amy’s Retreat and how you can help go to http://www.amysretreat.org.uk/


By Carrie-Ann Vessey


The Royal Wedding: A day of British Celebration

4 May

On April 29th 2011, whilst Prince William was marrying Catherine Middleton in one of the most anticipated weddings of the century, the rest of Britain were celebrating in their own unique ways.

Thousands decided to visit the capital, London, to get a glimpse of the bride and groom, the other 27million people in Britain watched from the comfort of their home, as the future King wed Catherine.

In Hull, although it was reported there had been no applications for street parties, people threw their own house parties and street parties in cul-de-sacs where there is no need for road closure. Retail stores also got into the spirit by decorating shop windows with Wills and Kate.

Heather Perry, 74, threw a party in east Hull, were a buffet was provided- complete with Great Britain style cups and plates- for her close friends as they watched the wedding together. “It is a great day for Britain. It’s a good chance for friends to get together have a celebration and toast to the happy couple. She really was a stunning bride.”

Heather along with friends Valerie Bell, 72 and Hazel, 66, were viewers of William’s parents, Prince Charles and Princess Diana’s wedding in 1981. Hazel said: “William did his mother proud today she would have been beaming with pride seeing him marry such a beautiful and elegant woman.”

Adam Watkinson, 21, also threw his own party but once the ceremony was over everyone moved outside for a pool party. “It’s just an excuse to drink really. The wedding was a bit boring to me, but it’s a great excuse to get everyone off work and together to have a good time. Although, we were hoping for better weather, after being in the pool it was freezing!”

Surrounded by bunting and Great Britain flags, Leah Fox, 21, explained why the Royal Wedding was good for Britain. “With the credit crunch and focus on politicians, it was nice to celebrate a Royal Wedding, it was a bit like a fairytale, she looked beautiful. Even people who are not interested in the wedding get the day off work and can just have fun.”

For Danielle Pashley, 21, the Wedding gave her extra reason to celebrate, “It’s my birthday on the 30th so it gives me an opportunity to have a pre-celebration. We’ve toasted to the Royals now I can drink into my birthday!”

Whilst her friends were watching the wedding, Natalie Blain, 20, had to work. “I was not impressed I missed it. But I did manage to sneak off to the staff room to catch a glimpse of what she was wearing. Her dress was amazing and she looked like a future Queen. Everyone looked so glamorous, although Prince Harry’s hair looked a bit windswept!”

Whilst the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge were celebrating becoming man and wife, Jayne Fox, 44, used the day to celebrate her recent engagement. “We got engaged on Christmas Day, but have never really celebrated it, so we just thought, what better day. Were celebrating a wedding so thought we might as well celebrate our engagement.”

The wedding may have come under criticism due to its extravagance- it reportedly cost £70million- when everyone is dealing with the recession, however, it gave the people the chance to come together to celebrate and feel proud to be British.


By Carrie-Ann Vessey

Tweet of The Week

3 May

Now we know we are a little behind with our Tweet of the Week but here at Country People Fashion we’ve been busy stuffing our faces with chocolate and celebrating the Royal Wedding. So we thought it was only right to choose our favourite tweet regarding the wedding. With so many great tweets the dicision was hard, but the winning tweet went to Piers Morgan for his simple discription of the wedding.

“Two kisses and an Aston Martin speed-by – classy work, William”

Country People Fashion Podcast: The Royal Wedding What we Think of the Dress, the Rings and the Hats

3 May

Congratulations Prince William and Catherine

1 May

Prince William wed Kate Middleton in one of the most anticipated weddings of the year.

Wearing an elegant wedding dress designed by Sarah Burton of Alexander McQueen, Catherine Middleton married the Prince at Westminster Abbey on 29th April.

The Prince, wearing the uniform of an Irish Guards Officer, was accompied by his best man, brother Harry as he wed Kate.

After the ceremony, which ran smoothly, the couple sealed their marriage with not one but two kisses on the Buckingham Palace balcony.

Surrounded by immediate family and the bridal party, the couple- now the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge- smiled and waved for the crowd before heading inside to begin the private celebrations.

By Carrie-Ann Vessey

How to find your individual style in second hand shops and why is it popular?

28 Apr

Probably, it is now part of student culture to wear something vintage. Wherever we go, we can see young people dressed as if they just appeared from the 1980’s or 1990’s for example. In Sheffield the amount of vintage clothing shops has doubled. There are about five vintage shops in the city centre and at least three of them have opened in the last year.

Shop on Division Street in Sheffield has no name, because the shop owner Nick has specific idea about his policy in selling second hand items. It is therefore people who want to find their individual style by combining something old and quality with something new and trendy. He said: “I remember when I was a student in London in the 1980’s I used to shop at Camden and Portobello flea markets, every single shop there looked exactly like mine. This is nothing new!  My store looks eclectic, like in the 1980’s and I think students of the 80’s were the beginners of the individuality, they were trying to find their identities through clothes.”  Nick believes that old clothes used to be better quality, because it is still wearable after 20-30 years, whereas if we buy clothes from Primark buttons are falling off the next day. High street shops and fashion magazines recreate the vintage look – all the patterns and style is now being copied from the most popular eras like the 1960’s or 1980’s for example. Therefore, this store offers unique and genuine pieces of clothing from the era each individual is interested in. It is also cheaper than high street prices, which makes it attractive for students especially.

The Freshman’s store on Carver Street is one of the oldest in Sheffield. Its owner Matthew and Paul in business for a very long time and have experience in sales in different places around the world such as Los Angeles and New York. Their shop is different to Nick’s store, as it looks neat and clean. Every item of clothing is ironed and carefully hanging on the rail. There are a lot of accessories, mirrors and lights, which creates an atmosphere of an individual and independent shop.

Generally it doesn’t matter what type the vintage or second hand shop is. People who buy pieces of clothing from previous eras find it attractive for various reasons. Firstly, it has been advertised a lot in the fashion world and has been very popular among students and hipsters. Secondly, it is always nostalgic to go twenty or ten years back, wear it today and stand out from the crowd.

     

All pictures by Yvan Rodic (Facehunter)

By Tanya Andrejeva

The growth of a foetus depicted through fashion, Helen and Katie Storey’s updated 1997 Primitive Streak collection in Sheffield

18 Apr

 Fashion meets biology in a creation of 27 dresses artfully depicting the key developments during the first 1,000 hours of human life.

Originally designed and made by two sisters 14 years ago, the ‘Primitive Streak’ collection is the art work of artist/designer Helen Storey and biologist Kate Storey. Together they made a collection which stylises the intricate processes each of us went through in the womb.

Talking to BBC’s Radio 4 Helen said that it was difficult at first and she felt paralysed by the project. But her sister saw it as “an extraordinary thing to be able to convey this process to as many different parts of the community as possible…I had a very unique opportunity, with Helen working in the fashion industry, to reach a completely different audience.”

With new pieces, including the ‘Lung Dress,’ a sample of them went on tour. They were showcased in Sheffield, Newcastle and London and have previously been to eight countries since 1997.

1) From day one. The ‘Sperm Coat’ represents, as the name suggests, fertilisation. Helen said she, “had to wait for biology to show me what to do.” This led to 105 hours of embroidery onto a fabric which was dissolved in water and this extremely delicate coat was born.

2) From day one. The ‘Anaphase’ dress is made from silk, mirrored paper and viscose jersey. Together they show cell division where the cell and DNA multiplies.

3) 5-6 days. The ‘Implantation’ dress shows the embryo (the white part) embedding in the womb (the black part). This causes the development of the placenta, creating a direct line to the mother’s nutrients.4) 12-14 days. This piece is where the collection got its name, Kate says this is because, “Primitive Streak is a really pivotal structure in the embryo”. This is where the internal organs and tissues are made from a cell layer called Mesoderm. This is formed when cells crawl from the top layer of the cell through a groove in the Primitive Streak, making the new layer in the middle. The Primitive Streak is represented by two metallic sheets which feed into the central black groove at the back of the dress. The gold metallic fabric is the Mesoderm emerging.

5-6) From day 20. The ‘Heart Bird’ dress is one in a series showing foetal heart development. This dress is made from crin and shows how the different chambers form. The shape of the dress is held by nylon wires and the heart was made by pulling fabric over a shaped wooden block.

7) 22-25 days. The ‘Neurulation’ dress is made from white fake fur and it shows how the central nervous system forms. A sheet of cells called the Neural Plate roll up into a tube which will develop into the brain and spinal cord.

8 ) From day 24. The ‘Limb Formation’ dress is made from an artist’s primed canvas. Chloe Sendall painted the expanding limb buds in oils to show the start of arms and legs growing on the four week old foetus.

9) 28 days to birth. The ‘Lung Dress’ shows how our lungs develop from two small buds branching out. This dress is made from soft, shiny sponge and the branching is printed onto the velvet and chiffon wing like lungs.

10) From day 33. The final dress in the exhibition is the ‘Spinal Column’ dress which is made from a patterned fabric and a resin cast spine. This was hand plated with foil and 8,000 fibre optic endings, representing the nerves extending out to the body, are threaded through.

This collection saw new life brought to an old project which Helen and her sister are still passionate about, “we’ve gone from the bleeding obvious, in some cases, to something of great complexity. We’ve tried to use fashion as a way to bring that to life.”

 

By Sarah Walters

For a larger view of the photos click on the picture

World Snooker Championship – 2 days to go!

13 Apr

The World Snooker Championship is the highlight of the snooker calendar. Held at the legendary Crucible Theatre in Sheffield since 1977, the event draws the best players from around the world to compete, in front of sell-out crowds, for the most coveted prize in the sport. The world’s top 16 seeded players are joined by 16 more that have battled through the qualifying rounds.

Officially starting on April 16th the Wold Snooker Championship is ready to be hosted at Crucible theatre in Sheffield. Tudor square is being prepared to translate all games outside the theatre for those who didn’t get a chance to get their tickets. It is an annual event in Sheffield, and it attracts a lot of different audiences – not only snooker fans, because it puts Sheffield on the map and draws lots of attention during the whole tournament.

Theatre’s management keep preparing their staff for the busy times: “Everything is ready to host the tournament. We have some improvements and we want to make this championship highly serviced and professional,” says Andy Cooper, the senior operations manager.

Tudor Square, Sheffield

By Tanya Andrejeva

Battle Of The Bands!

31 Mar

 

A charity event has been organised in Sheffield to help raise money for families who have children with cancer.

‘Battle of the Bands’ will take place in Walkabout, Carver Street, off West Street, on April 4th. Local Sheffield bands- Scrim, Kiziah and the Kings and Section 60- will each play a 30minute set and the audience will decide who the best band is. A DJ will then play out the rest of the night.

The theme of the night is popstars, so guests are invited to come as their favourite singer and the best dressed will win a trophy and a prize. Everyone who buys a ticket will automatically be entered into a raffle with prizes such as:

•La Tasca – Meal for 2 with a bottle of wine
•Pizza Express Hamper
•Taylor and Taylor – 2 cut and finishes up for grabs
•2 x Lyceum Theatre Tickets
•TGI Friday – £30 voucher
•Holly Bowling vouchers
Mercure Spa – 2x day passes
•Pure gym – 10 free PT sessions
– 5 goody bags
•Nando’s Voucher
•Hocky family ticket to a season game

All proceeds from the night go to Amy’s Retreat, a Sheffield based charity set up by Joanne and Stephen Hall after their daughter, Amy, died of cancer aged five. The charity gives families with children who suffer who cancer, the chance to go away and spend time together as a family.

Event co-ordinator Frances Child said: “The foundation is completely selfless, and deserves all the exposure it can get. There has been great cooperation from the community and local businesses in providing prizes and giving their support, I’m glad that I am able to be a part of helping this cause.”

Tickets can be purchased now or on the night at Walkabout for £5, all proceeds will be going to charity.

For more information visit http://www.amysretreat.org.uk/

 


Leader of Sheffield City Council tells Castle Market store holders to: “downsize or go.”

29 Mar

In an interview today the leader of Sheffield City Council, Paul Scriven, was calm and well practised in answering questions about his support for the government and Nick Clegg’s vision for this country. But, when questioned about the locally controversial Castle Market his composure faltered and his answers had an undertone of irritation.

Essentially he held his morals in the right place and emphasised the council’s focus on saving social care services. He said: “Stall holders at Castle Market have been subsidised by the tax payer since 1993” and made it clear that they were not top priority in this city.

He saw it as unfair that they are expecting special treatment when shop owners from elsewhere in Sheffield may also be struggling and services such as Sure Start were at risk of being cut. He asked if he should put money into business or social care.

Mr Scriven claimed his powers are limited, “I can’t change the habits of shoppers and we’ve already invested huge amounts of money to get people into the city centre. Castle Market has been in a difficult position for years and we have helped promote it.”

The issue has come about prior to the new £18million market being built in The Moor where current stalls are expected to relocate in 2013. Since 2008 Castle Market stall holders have had a 40% discount on their rent which is going to be taken away and many are concerned they will not be in business to see the new development.

The council hopes the new market will bring in a more diverse range of customers but essentially Mr Scriven swept the subject aside and said: “They’re either going to have to downsize or go.”

 

By Sarah Walters

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