Tag Archives: Sheffield

How to find your individual style in second hand shops and why is it popular?

28 Apr

Probably, it is now part of student culture to wear something vintage. Wherever we go, we can see young people dressed as if they just appeared from the 1980’s or 1990’s for example. In Sheffield the amount of vintage clothing shops has doubled. There are about five vintage shops in the city centre and at least three of them have opened in the last year.

Shop on Division Street in Sheffield has no name, because the shop owner Nick has specific idea about his policy in selling second hand items. It is therefore people who want to find their individual style by combining something old and quality with something new and trendy. He said: “I remember when I was a student in London in the 1980’s I used to shop at Camden and Portobello flea markets, every single shop there looked exactly like mine. This is nothing new!  My store looks eclectic, like in the 1980’s and I think students of the 80’s were the beginners of the individuality, they were trying to find their identities through clothes.”  Nick believes that old clothes used to be better quality, because it is still wearable after 20-30 years, whereas if we buy clothes from Primark buttons are falling off the next day. High street shops and fashion magazines recreate the vintage look – all the patterns and style is now being copied from the most popular eras like the 1960’s or 1980’s for example. Therefore, this store offers unique and genuine pieces of clothing from the era each individual is interested in. It is also cheaper than high street prices, which makes it attractive for students especially.

The Freshman’s store on Carver Street is one of the oldest in Sheffield. Its owner Matthew and Paul in business for a very long time and have experience in sales in different places around the world such as Los Angeles and New York. Their shop is different to Nick’s store, as it looks neat and clean. Every item of clothing is ironed and carefully hanging on the rail. There are a lot of accessories, mirrors and lights, which creates an atmosphere of an individual and independent shop.

Generally it doesn’t matter what type the vintage or second hand shop is. People who buy pieces of clothing from previous eras find it attractive for various reasons. Firstly, it has been advertised a lot in the fashion world and has been very popular among students and hipsters. Secondly, it is always nostalgic to go twenty or ten years back, wear it today and stand out from the crowd.

     

All pictures by Yvan Rodic (Facehunter)

By Tanya Andrejeva

The growth of a foetus depicted through fashion, Helen and Katie Storey’s updated 1997 Primitive Streak collection in Sheffield

18 Apr

 Fashion meets biology in a creation of 27 dresses artfully depicting the key developments during the first 1,000 hours of human life.

Originally designed and made by two sisters 14 years ago, the ‘Primitive Streak’ collection is the art work of artist/designer Helen Storey and biologist Kate Storey. Together they made a collection which stylises the intricate processes each of us went through in the womb.

Talking to BBC’s Radio 4 Helen said that it was difficult at first and she felt paralysed by the project. But her sister saw it as “an extraordinary thing to be able to convey this process to as many different parts of the community as possible…I had a very unique opportunity, with Helen working in the fashion industry, to reach a completely different audience.”

With new pieces, including the ‘Lung Dress,’ a sample of them went on tour. They were showcased in Sheffield, Newcastle and London and have previously been to eight countries since 1997.

1) From day one. The ‘Sperm Coat’ represents, as the name suggests, fertilisation. Helen said she, “had to wait for biology to show me what to do.” This led to 105 hours of embroidery onto a fabric which was dissolved in water and this extremely delicate coat was born.

2) From day one. The ‘Anaphase’ dress is made from silk, mirrored paper and viscose jersey. Together they show cell division where the cell and DNA multiplies.

3) 5-6 days. The ‘Implantation’ dress shows the embryo (the white part) embedding in the womb (the black part). This causes the development of the placenta, creating a direct line to the mother’s nutrients.4) 12-14 days. This piece is where the collection got its name, Kate says this is because, “Primitive Streak is a really pivotal structure in the embryo”. This is where the internal organs and tissues are made from a cell layer called Mesoderm. This is formed when cells crawl from the top layer of the cell through a groove in the Primitive Streak, making the new layer in the middle. The Primitive Streak is represented by two metallic sheets which feed into the central black groove at the back of the dress. The gold metallic fabric is the Mesoderm emerging.

5-6) From day 20. The ‘Heart Bird’ dress is one in a series showing foetal heart development. This dress is made from crin and shows how the different chambers form. The shape of the dress is held by nylon wires and the heart was made by pulling fabric over a shaped wooden block.

7) 22-25 days. The ‘Neurulation’ dress is made from white fake fur and it shows how the central nervous system forms. A sheet of cells called the Neural Plate roll up into a tube which will develop into the brain and spinal cord.

8 ) From day 24. The ‘Limb Formation’ dress is made from an artist’s primed canvas. Chloe Sendall painted the expanding limb buds in oils to show the start of arms and legs growing on the four week old foetus.

9) 28 days to birth. The ‘Lung Dress’ shows how our lungs develop from two small buds branching out. This dress is made from soft, shiny sponge and the branching is printed onto the velvet and chiffon wing like lungs.

10) From day 33. The final dress in the exhibition is the ‘Spinal Column’ dress which is made from a patterned fabric and a resin cast spine. This was hand plated with foil and 8,000 fibre optic endings, representing the nerves extending out to the body, are threaded through.

This collection saw new life brought to an old project which Helen and her sister are still passionate about, “we’ve gone from the bleeding obvious, in some cases, to something of great complexity. We’ve tried to use fashion as a way to bring that to life.”

 

By Sarah Walters

For a larger view of the photos click on the picture

Leader of Sheffield City Council tells Castle Market store holders to: “downsize or go.”

29 Mar

In an interview today the leader of Sheffield City Council, Paul Scriven, was calm and well practised in answering questions about his support for the government and Nick Clegg’s vision for this country. But, when questioned about the locally controversial Castle Market his composure faltered and his answers had an undertone of irritation.

Essentially he held his morals in the right place and emphasised the council’s focus on saving social care services. He said: “Stall holders at Castle Market have been subsidised by the tax payer since 1993” and made it clear that they were not top priority in this city.

He saw it as unfair that they are expecting special treatment when shop owners from elsewhere in Sheffield may also be struggling and services such as Sure Start were at risk of being cut. He asked if he should put money into business or social care.

Mr Scriven claimed his powers are limited, “I can’t change the habits of shoppers and we’ve already invested huge amounts of money to get people into the city centre. Castle Market has been in a difficult position for years and we have helped promote it.”

The issue has come about prior to the new £18million market being built in The Moor where current stalls are expected to relocate in 2013. Since 2008 Castle Market stall holders have had a 40% discount on their rent which is going to be taken away and many are concerned they will not be in business to see the new development.

The council hopes the new market will bring in a more diverse range of customers but essentially Mr Scriven swept the subject aside and said: “They’re either going to have to downsize or go.”

 

By Sarah Walters

Sheffield City Council Leader Paul Scriven claims the Budget will not affect the people of Sheffield

23 Mar

Sheffield City Council Leader Paul Scriven reassures the people of Sheffield that they will not be affected by the cuts after Labour leader Ed Miliband accused Chancellor George Osbourne of conning voters with small giveaways that are dwarfed by tax rises.

Mr Scriven’s comments came after Mr Miliband likened Mr Osborne to Derek Trotter, the cockney wheeler dealer in the BBC comedy Only Fools and Horses during today’s budget. He said: “The Chancellor has cut fuel duty by 1p, but he’s whacked up VAT on fuel by 3p. Families won’t be fooled’ its Del Boy economics.”

In the budget Mr Osborne cancelled next month’s 4p rise in fuel duty and a further 1p will be cut from pump prices at 6pm- all paid for by a £2bn tax on oil companies. He also froze alcohol duties and air duties- but increased tobacco tax by 2%.

Mr Osborne told MPs: “Last year’s emergency Budget was about rescuing the nation’s finances, and paying for the mistakes of the past.

“Today’s Budget is about reforming the nation’s economy, so that we have enduring growth and jobs in the future.

“And it’s about doing what we can to help families with the cost of living and the high oil price.”

To help families with the high costs of living, council tax is to be frozen or reduced this year in every English council and a 10% discount on inheritance tax is to be given for people leaving 10% of their estate to charity. With Mr Osborne stating: “Do the right thing for charity and the Government will do the right thing for you.”

Sheffield City Councillor Leader Paul Scriven claims the spending cuts will not cause a problem for the people of Sheffield: “One thing I have been clear about is that we wouldn’t be having mass closures. There have been no closures of public buildings such as libraries, leisure centres or public toilets.”

Despite Mr Scriven’s reassurance that Sheffield will not be affected by the cuts, not everyone is convinced.

Student Nurse Rachael Davy, 21, said: “It’s ok saying public buildings are being kept open, but the fact of the matter is there are less jobs and unemployment is high. That is what they should be working on.”

There also seems to be a worry about the future of students in the city, student Alex Unwin, 22, said: “Sheffield brings in thousands of students every year, they want to graduate and get a good job, as the government has cut so many jobs it is less likely they will find jobs adding to the unemployment rate.”

Rise in petrol prices is also a big concern, food innovations assistant Rachel Rasouli, 20, said: “They’re trying to sugar coat it, but petrol prices are rising, the cost of living is going up and it doesn’t seem to be changing anytime soon.”

Justice Minister, Kenneth Clarke, also didn’t seem convinced by the Chancellors ‘budget for growth’ as he appeared to doze off during his speech, prompting a dig by Mr Miliband: “Indeed the Justice Secretary fell asleep during the Chancellor’s speech, his growth strategy was so compelling.”

By Carrie-Ann Vessey

Peaceful Protests in Sheffield

15 Mar

Protests held in Sheffield at the Liberal Democrat Spring Conference went ahead with no major incidents.

A massive security operation, costing an estimated £2million, had been put into place as an 8ft high concrete and steel fence was erected around the City Hall and 1,000 police officers were deployed.

Around 5,000 protesters, half the expected amount, took part in the march which set off from Devonshire Green at 11am and finished at City Hall where the Lib Dems conference took place.

Despite concerns the protesters would mirror the chaos of vandalism and violence protests in London last November caused, the weekend proved to be mainly a good natured affair, with only one arrest.

South Yorkshire Police confirmed a 24 year old man had been arrested for a public order offence and the discharge of a firework in a public place. He was given a £80 fixed penalty fine and released.

The march was organised by a range of groups including Right To Work and the Sheffield Anti-Cuts Alliance.

By Carrie-Ann Vessey

Did You Know That 8 March is International Women’s Day?

8 Mar

8 March – is International Women’s Day – a global women’s day celebrating political, economic and social achievements of women in the past, present and future. The day is celebrated in UN countries, but in some places like Russia, China, Bulgaria, Ukraine, Belarus, Armenia – 8th March is a national holiday.

Clara Zetkin drawing by I.Brodski

Clara Zetkin

The International Women’s Day was suggested by Clara Zetkin (Leader of the ‘Women’s Office’ for the Social Democratic Party in Germany) during the second International Conference of Working Women in 1910 held in Copenhagen. She proposed that every year in every country there should be a celebration of women – a Women’s Day. Zetkin’s suggestion was greeted by hundreds of women involved and approved the idea; therefore International Women’s Day was established.

International Women’s Day is a holiday of ordinary women, who have become creators of history. Historically, it is based on centuries-old battle of women for their rights and equal contribution to social life alongside with men.

In the UK it seems that a lot of people have never heard about this day and therefore don’t even know that traditionally in some countries women are treated with flowers and compliments from their partners, husbands, friends, fathers etc. It is the best day to say compliments and cherish women as they have achieved so much since they got their right to vote and be equal to men in most aspects of social life.

Coming from Latvia – (the post Soviet country), where the majority of people are still following the Soviet traditions and celebrate holidays like 8th of March, I was surprised none of my British friends had ever heard about the Women’s Day. I have always took it for granted that somebody has to give me some flowers and say how beautiful I looked that day…Even in primary school, mothers were making their sons give a flower to every girl in the class and it didn’t matter whether one fancied a girl or not, it was a gesture of respect. Of course some girls were treated with chocolate as well, because they usually helped them with homework. It is considered that a man’s behaviour is quite rude if he doesn’t greet a woman he knows – a mother, a wife, a girlfriend, a colleague or a friend. He’s expected to say some compliments at least, if not – he’s not brought-up well. Usually, it is not the case with men from Eastern Europe, they are willing to present some flowers quite often, especially when it’s Women’s Day – it is a great reason to make women smile.

Although, some people in the UK might be aware that such day exists, but there is no tradition to give flowers to women in their families or at work, which is quite disappointing, because women deserve to get flowers every day.

By Tanya Andrejeva

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